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Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative - Serum

The Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test, also known as the Cotinine test, is a laboratory test that measures the amount of cotinine, the primary metabolite of nicotine, in the blood serum. This test is primarily used to determine whether a person uses tobacco or has been exposed to secondhand smoke, as cotinine can be detected in various bodily fluids for several days after the use of tobacco.


  • Profile Name: Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative - Serum
  • Sample Type: Blood
  • Preparations Required: No special preparation is needed for this test. Continue your usual diet, drinking, and medication unless instructed otherwise by your healthcare provider.
  • Report Time: 2 days

Nicotine is a potent parasympathomimetic alkaloid found in the nightshade family of plants and is a stimulant drug. It is widely consumed worldwide in the form of tobacco, primarily through smoking cigarettes. Upon entering the body, nicotine is metabolized into several metabolites, including cotinine, which is considered a reliable marker of nicotine exposure.

The Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test is often used in medical and research settings to objectively verify a person's tobacco use status, to evaluate nicotine's pharmacokinetic properties, and to assess exposure to secondhand smoke. It may also be used in certain employment and insurance settings, where confirmation of tobacco use may impact employment opportunities or insurance premiums.

Home Sample Collection Process
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Book your convenient slot
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Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
3
Reporting of the sample at lab
Reporting of the sample at lab
4
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Frequently Asked Questions

The test involves a simple blood draw, usually from a vein in the arm. The blood sample is then sent to a laboratory, where it is tested for the presence and amount of cotinine.

The turnaround time for the Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test is usually 2-4 days, although this can vary depending on the specific laboratory.

The specific cut-off for distinguishing smokers from non-smokers can vary, but typically, a cotinine level in the serum of more than 10 ng/mL is considered indicative of active smoking or heavy exposure to secondhand smoke.

Nicotine use, particularly through smoking tobacco, is associated with numerous health risks, including various types of cancer (especially lung cancer), heart disease, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The best way to reduce your exposure to nicotine is to quit using tobacco products. Various resources, including medications and counseling services, are available to help people quit smoking. Additionally, avoiding environments where smoking is common can reduce exposure to secondhand smoke.

Yes, the test can detect nicotine exposure from any source, including nicotine replacement therapy products (such as patches or gum) and electronic cigarettes.

An elevated cotinine level in your serum usually indicates that you have used tobacco or have been exposed to secondhand smoke. Your healthcare provider will interpret your test results, taking into account your history of tobacco use, symptoms, and other medical information.

Yes, you can take this test if you are using a nicotine replacement therapy product. However, these products will contribute to the amount of cotinine in your serum, so you should inform your healthcare provider if you are using these products.

Coverage for the Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test can vary depending on the insurance provider and plan. Some insurance companies may cover this test if it is medically necessary. However, if the test is being performed for employment or insurance purposes, it may not be covered. You should check with your insurance provider to determine your coverage.

No special preparation is needed for the Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test. Continue your usual diet, drinking, and medication unless instructed otherwise by your healthcare provider.

As the Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test involves a blood draw, there are minimal risks involved, such as slight pain or bruising at the site of the needle prick. There is also a very small risk of infection.

The Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test is a reliable and accurate method for detecting recent nicotine use or exposure to secondhand smoke. However, it cannot determine the exact amount of nicotine used or the exact time of exposure.

Yes, you can usually take your medications as usual before this test. However, certain medications may affect the test results, so it's important to inform your healthcare provider about any medications you're taking.

Various factors can affect your test results, including the use of tobacco or nicotine-containing products, exposure to secondhand smoke, and use of certain medications. Your healthcare provider will interpret your test results in light of these factors.

If your test results show that you have been exposed to nicotine and you want to quit smoking, various resources are available to help you quit. These include medications, counseling services, and support groups. Your healthcare provider can provide more information on these resources.

Yes, the Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test can be used to monitor your progress if you're trying to quit smoking. The test can verify whether you have refrained from using tobacco and can provide objective feedback on your quitting process.

The frequency of testing depends on the reason for the test. If the test is being used to verify abstinence from smoking as part of a smoking cessation program, it may be performed at regular intervals. If the test is being used for medical or research purposes, the frequency of testing will depend on the specific study or medical condition.

Yes, the Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test can detect exposure to secondhand smoke. However, the level of cotinine in the serum may be lower in people exposed to secondhand smoke compared to those who actively smoke.

The requirement for this test depends on your specific circumstances. If you are participating in a smoking cessation program, your healthcare provider may recommend regular testing. If the test is for medical or research purposes, the requirement will depend on the specific study or medical condition.

No, the Nicotine Metabolite Quantitative test requires a blood draw, which needs to be done by a trained healthcare professional. The test should be conducted in a healthcare facility or laboratory.

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