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IHC - Microsatellite Instability - Colorectal Carcinoma PMS-2 Test | Sprint Diagnostics Hyderabad

Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a condition that leads to changes in the lengths of short sequences of DNA. This instability is caused due to the loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) function, which can result in the development of cancer. Among the MMR proteins, PMS2 protein is one of them. An IHC - PMS2 test is performed to check for the presence or absence of this protein in the cells of a tissue sample. The absence of PMS2 can indicate a high likelihood of MSI.

This test plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment planning of colorectal carcinoma. Colorectal carcinoma is the third most common cancer and is also a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The results of this test help in identifying individuals with a genetic condition known as Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), which increases the risk of colorectal cancer and certain other types of cancer.

  • Test Name: IHC - Microsatellite Instability for Colorectal Carcinoma PMS-2
  • Sample Type: Tissue
  • Preparations Required: There are no specific instructions for the patient prior to this test. It uses tissue obtained through a biopsy or surgery
  • Report Time: 4 days

Home Sample Collection Process
1
Book your convenient slot
Book your convenient slot
2
Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
3
Reporting of the sample at lab
Reporting of the sample at lab
4
Download Reports
Download Reports
Frequently Asked Questions

The IHC - PMS2 test is important because it can identify individuals who have a high risk of developing colorectal carcinoma due to Lynch syndrome. It helps in early detection and intervention of this potentially life-threatening condition.

No, fasting is not required for this test as it uses a tissue sample obtained from a biopsy or surgical procedure.

There is no specific preparation required for the patient. The tissue sample is usually collected by a healthcare provider during a surgical procedure or biopsy.

You may be advised to undergo this test if you have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer, especially if your family has a history of the disease, or if your doctor suspects Lynch syndrome based on certain clinical criteria.

The IHC - PMS2 test helps to detect the presence or absence of PMS2 protein in the cells of a tissue sample. The absence of PMS2 can indicate a high likelihood of microsatellite instability, which is associated with a higher risk of colorectal carcinoma and suggests the possibility of Lynch syndrome.

The frequency of this test depends on individual circumstances and your doctor's recommendations. It's typically performed when colorectal cancer is diagnosed to help determine the best treatment strategy.

In a normal test result, the PMS2 protein is present in the cells. Absence or reduced expression of PMS2 protein is considered abnormal and can indicate a likelihood of microsatellite instability.

No special precautions are required for this test as the tissue sample is collected by a healthcare provider.

Mutations in the PMS2 gene that lead to a loss or reduction in the production of PMS2 protein can affect the levels. This is often a non-modifiable factor as it is related to one's genetic makeup.

If your test values are abnormal, you should consult your treating oncologist or a genetic counselor who can guide you about the next steps, which may include further testing or a discussion about potential treatment options.

An abnormal result can suggest a higher risk of colorectal carcinoma due to microsatellite instability. Your doctor will discuss the results and possibly suggest further genetic testing to confirm Lynch syndrome and develop a personalized treatment plan.

While the IHC - PMS2 test is an important tool for diagnosing Lynch syndrome, further genetic testing is usually required to confirm the diagnosis.

The IHC - PMS2 test is a reliable and established method for checking the presence of the PMS2 protein. However, results should always be interpreted in conjunction with clinical symptoms and other laboratory findings.

No, this test requires a tissue sample, which needs to be collected by a healthcare provider through a biopsy or surgical procedure. It cannot be done at home.

The absence of PMS2 protein may suggest a genetic form of colorectal cancer known as Lynch syndrome. However, further genetic testing is usually required to confirm this diagnosis.

In conclusion, the IHC - PMS2 test serves as a crucial tool for early detection of Lynch syndrome and to guide appropriate treatment strategies in patients with colorectal carcinoma. Always consult with your healthcare provider for any questions or concerns you might have about this test.

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