Offers
a-g-albumin-globulin-ratio

IHC - Microsatellite Instability for Colorectal Carcinoma MSH-6 Test, Price, Normal Range | Sprint Diagnostics Hyderabad

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) - Microsatellite Instability for Colorectal Carcinoma MSH-6 is a specialized diagnostic test performed on tissue samples to evaluate for changes in the MSH-6 protein, a crucial component of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system.

The MMR system corrects errors that can occur when DNA is copied (replicated) during cell division. Mutations in the MSH6 gene, responsible for producing the MSH-6 protein, may compromise the effectiveness of the MMR system, leading to a phenomenon known as microsatellite instability (MSI).

Microsatellites are short, repeated sequences of DNA, which can become unstable due to errors in DNA replication. If the MMR system fails to correct these errors, MSI can occur, which is a characteristic of certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer.

By testing for changes in the MSH-6 protein, clinicians can gain valuable insight into the likelihood of colorectal cancer, particularly in individuals with a family history of the disease or with other risk factors. It also helps in determining the most suitable treatment options, as tumors with high MSI (MSI-H) may respond differently to certain therapies compared to those with low MSI (MSI-L) or microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors.

  • Test Name: IHC - Microsatellite Instability for Colorectal Carcinoma MSH-6
  • Sample Type: Tissue
  • Preparations Required: No special preparation is needed for this test. Follow your doctor's instructions regarding medication and diet.
  • Report Time: 4 days

Home Sample Collection Process
1
Book your convenient slot
Book your convenient slot
2
Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
3
Reporting of the sample at lab
Reporting of the sample at lab
4
Download Reports
Download Reports
Frequently Asked Questions

The IHC - MSH-6 test is important because it can help identify the presence of microsatellite instability, a characteristic of certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Identifying this can aid in the diagnosis and guide treatment decisions.

A positive result indicates the presence of microsatellite instability, suggesting the possibility of colorectal cancer.

A negative result suggests that the MSH-6 protein is functioning normally, and there is no microsatellite instability. However, it does not entirely rule out the presence of cancer. Other diagnostic tests may be necessary.

This test may be recommended for individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors. It may also be used to guide treatment decisions in individuals who have already been diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

The test is performed on a tissue sample, typically obtained through a biopsy. The sample is then stained with a specific antibody that binds to the MSH-6 protein and observed under a microscope.

While this test is primarily used to identify colorectal cancer, microsatellite instability is also associated with other types of cancer, such as endometrial cancer. Therefore, the test may provide useful information in other contexts as well.

No, fasting is not required for this test.

The test itself does not pose any risks. However, obtaining a tissue sample for testing may involve some risks, depending on the method of collection.

Certain factors, such as the quality of the tissue sample and the specific method used for staining and observing the sample, can potentially affect the test results.

If your test results are abnormal, it is important to discuss the findings with your doctor, who can provide further guidance based on your overall health condition, symptoms, and other diagnostic tests.

The frequency of testing varies based on individual circumstances and will be determined by your healthcare provider.

Coverage for this test depends on your specific insurance plan. It is recommended to check with your insurance provider to understand the coverage details.

No, this test requires a tissue sample that needs to be analyzed in a lab using specialized techniques and equipment. It cannot be done at home.

Other tests, such as genetic testing or other types of immunohistochemistry tests, can also provide information about the likelihood of colorectal cancer.

No, a normal result cannot guarantee the absence of colorectal cancer. It only suggests that the MSH-6 protein is functioning normally and there is no microsatellite instability. Other diagnostic tests may be necessary.

IHC - MSH-6 is a valuable diagnostic tool in the fight against colorectal cancer, offering insight into the genetic abnormalities that can drive the disease. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors, this test could potentially provide an early detection tool and contribute to a more personalized approach to your healthcare. As always, it is important to discuss any concerns or symptoms with your healthcare provider.

Book Your Slot
Locations Near You in Hyderabad
  • 4KM from Madhapur
  • 3KM from Banjara Hills
  • 1.9KM from Yusufguda
  • 3KM from Madhura Nagar
  • 5KM from Shaikpet