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h-TTG /Dgp (Tissue Transglutaminase Dgp) Screen

The h-TTG/Dgp Screen is a diagnostic test that helps in identifying certain conditions related to the immune system, especially celiac disease. This disease is a chronic autoimmune disorder in which ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. It affects individuals who are genetically predisposed.


  • Profile Name: h-TTG /Dgp (Tissue Transglutaminase Dgp) Screen
  • Sample Type: Blood
  • Preparations Required: None
  • Report Time: 2 days

The h-TTG/Dgp Screen is a type of blood test that measures the level of specific antibodies - namely, anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (Dgp) antibodies - that are commonly elevated in people with celiac disease. These antibodies are produced by the immune system in response to gluten ingestion in celiac disease.

This test is typically used to help diagnose celiac disease, especially in individuals who display symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, or malabsorption. It can also be helpful in monitoring individuals who have already been diagnosed with celiac disease to evaluate their response to a gluten- free diet.

Home Sample Collection Process
1
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Book your convenient slot
2
Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
3
Reporting of the sample at lab
Reporting of the sample at lab
4
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Frequently Asked Questions

The h-TTG/Dgp Screen is a blood test that measures the levels of anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (Dgp) antibodies. It is primarily used to help diagnose celiac disease.

This test is performed to help diagnose celiac disease, especially in individuals who have symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, or malabsorption. It can also be used to monitor individuals with celiac disease and evaluate their response to a gluten-free diet.

This test is performed using a sample of blood. The blood sample is sent to a laboratory, where it is analyzed for the presence of tTG and Dgp antibodies.

No, fasting is not typically required before this test.

No specific preparation is needed for this test. However, it is important to inform your doctor of any medications or supplements you are taking as these may affect the test results.

The frequency of testing will depend on your symptoms and the recommendations of your healthcare provider.

High levels of tTG and Dgp antibodies in the blood can be an indication of celiac disease. However, further diagnostic tests may be needed to confirm the diagnosis.

There are minimal risks associated with this test as it simply involves a routine blood draw.

No, this test requires a blood sample to be taken by a healthcare professional and needs to be analyzed in a laboratory.

Certain factors such as recent gluten consumption, use of certain medications, and other autoimmune conditions can affect the test results.

If your test results are positive, it means that you may have celiac disease. Your doctor will likely recommend additional tests to confirm the diagnosis and discuss potential treatment options with you.

The main treatment for celiac disease is a strict, lifelong gluten-free diet.

Yes, other conditions such as type 1 diabetes, thyroid disease, and liver disease can also cause elevated tTG or Dgp levels.

tTG antibodies are produced by the immune system in response to tissue transglutaminase, an enzyme found in the gut. Dgp antibodies are produced in response to deamidated gliadin peptides, a component of gluten. Both types of antibodies are commonly elevated in people with celiac disease.

Both tests measure the levels of specific antibodies in the blood that are commonly elevated in people with celiac disease, but they are not the same test. The tTG test measures anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, while the Dgp test measures Deamidated Gliadin Peptide antibodies.

The h-TTG/Dgp Screen is considered very reliable for diagnosing celiac disease, especially when combined with other diagnostic methods such as a small intestine biopsy.

Yes, it is possible to have celiac disease even if your test results are negative. If you have symptoms of celiac disease and your test results are negative, your doctor may recommend further testing.

Yes, it is actually recommended to continue eating a normal diet that includes gluten before this test. If you stop eating gluten before the test, it can affect the test results.

No, this test cannot diagnose non-celiac gluten sensitivity. It is specifically designed to detect antibodies associated with celiac disease.

While there is currently no cure for celiac disease, the condition can be effectively managed with a strict, lifelong gluten-free diet.

h-TTG /Dgp (Tissue transglutaminase Dgp) Screen
₹ 2000
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