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Double Marker Test

The double marker test, or dual marker test, is a prenatal screening procedure performed during pregnancy to assess the risk of certain chromosomal abnormalities and birth defects in the fetus. It is usually conducted between 10 to 14 weeks of gestation. The test involves measuring two specific substances in the mother's blood: human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A). Abnormal levels of these markers may indicate a higher risk of conditions like Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome.


  • Profile Name: Double Marker Test
  • Sample Type: Blood
  • Preparations Required: No special preparations are usually required.
  • Report Time: 48 hrs

The double marker test does not provide a definitive diagnosis but helps identify pregnancies that may require further evaluation, such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. These invasive procedures can confirm the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. It is essential to remember that the double marker test only offers a probability assessment and not a definitive diagnosis. It is a crucial tool in aiding parents and healthcare providers to make informed decisions regarding the pregnancy and potential further testing.

Home Sample Collection Process
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Book your convenient slot
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Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
Sample Collection by Phlebotomist
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Reporting of the sample at lab
Reporting of the sample at lab
4
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Frequently Asked Questions

The double marker test is important as it helps assess the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus early in pregnancy, allowing parents to make informed decisions about further diagnostic testing or prenatal care. Early detection of potential issues can facilitate timely interventions and support for the well-being of both the baby and the expectant mother.

No, fasting is generally not needed before the double marker test.

Typically, there are no specific preparations needed for the double marker test.

The double marker test should be done during pregnancy to assess the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus, such as Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome.

The double marker test provides information about the levels of specific substances (hCG and PAPP-A) in the maternal blood, helping assess the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus and aiding in decision-making regarding further diagnostic testing or prenatal care.

The double marker test is typically performed once during pregnancy between 10 to 14 weeks of gestation. It is not a routine test and is recommended based on maternal age, medical history, and other risk factors.

The normal levels of the double marker test can vary depending on the laboratory and the specific units used for measurement. In general, normal levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) markers in the maternal blood suggest a lower risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus. Abnormal levels may indicate a higher risk, warranting further evaluation and diagnostic testing.

Before and after the double marker test, no specific precautions are required; pregnant women can resume normal activities without restrictions. Follow up with the healthcare provider to discuss test results and any further actions.

Factors affecting double-marker test results include gestational age, maternal age, multiple pregnancies, fetal factors, and laboratory variations.

If the double marker test results show an abnormality, you should consult an obstetrician or a maternal-fetal medicine specialist.

The accuracy of double marker test results varies, but it is generally considered a reliable screening tool for assessing the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus.

The double marker test results can impact pregnancy management based on risk assessment. Low-risk results indicate no further invasive testing, while high-risk results require additional diagnostic tests like amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling.

No, the double marker test cannot predict the severity or prognosis of the detected abnormality. It is a screening test that assesses the risk of chromosomal abnormalities but does not provide specific information about the extent or impact of the abnormality on the fetus or the long-term prognosis.

No, the double marker test is not used to monitor the response to treatment. It is not designed for monitoring treatment outcomes.

The double marker test is of utmost importance in prenatal care as it helps assess the risk of chromosomal abnormalities like Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome early in pregnancy. Being a non-invasive screening procedure, it poses no risk to the fetus. The test offers parents crucial information about their baby's health, allowing them to make informed decisions regarding further diagnostic tests or medical interventions. Early detection enables early preparation for the birth of a child with special needs and provides an opportunity for timely medical interventions if required. It enhances prenatal care and support, ensuring the well-being of both the baby and the expectant mother.

DOUBLE MARKER, SERUM
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